Materials and Demos

Venice.

Boston University Venice Workshop on Natural Pigments, October 2015 During our Venice worskshop, we were invited to give a demonstration to students at Boston University in Venice. The lecture covered egg tempera and natural pigments at the core of our research: iron gall and sepia ink, saffron, verdigris. Students were able to experiment with these pigments in a hands-on demonstration. Special thanks to Professor Riccardo Giacomini, Program Coordinator Elena Zago, and Elisabetta Convento, Director of the Boston University Venice program. Pictures by Elena Zago.

 

Assisi.

Making Elderberry Ink

Assisi.

Making Vine and cherry pits black pigments

Dublin.

Ancient and Medieval Pigments Demonstration at the 9th International Experimental Archeology Conference, University College Dublin, in January 2015.

http://www.ucd.ie/archaeology/eac9/

Plymouth.

Making Cochineal Pigment

Venice.

Boston University Venice Workshop on Natural Pigments, October 2014 During our Venice worskshop, we were invited to give a demonstration to students at Boston University in Venice. The lecture covered egg tempera and natural pigments at the core of our research: iron gall and sepia ink, saffron, verdigris. Students were able to experiment with these pigments in a hands-on demonstration. Special thanks to Professor Luca De Gaetano, Program Coordinator Elena Zago, and Elisabetta Convento, Director of the Boston University Venice program.

Plymouth.

Making Bone Black Pigment from Roasted Chicken Bones The beautiful puzzle piece ones are vertebrae. Not entirely black, but will make a rich brownish dark grey.

Plymouth.

Medieval Cooking and Color Experiments: Green Sauce and Lamb Shoulder with Bacon Green ingredients: parsley, sage, pepper, cloves, nutmeg, cinnamon, ginger, garlic, verjuice.

Tarano.

Making Black Pigment from Apricot Pits

Venice.

Making Cuttlefish Ink, or Sepia

Tarano.

Making Vine Black, or Vine Charcoal Clippings from my San Giovese vines are tied in bundles, placed in an oven safe ceramic pot, and sealed. They are then cooked on hot coals of a dying fire, about 8 hours. The result is a deep blue-black for drawing or to be ground for pigments with oil or tempera.

Making Iron Gall Ink Locally sourced galls ferment for 14 days. Iron sulfate and gum arabic are added. The result is a dark brown ink with good staining property.

More here.